A Passage and A Prayer 1/16/19

They (Paul, Silas and Timothy) attempted to go into Bithynia, but the Spirit of Jesus did not allow them. So, passing by Mysia, they went down to Troas.  And a vision appeared to Paul in the night: a man of Macedonia was standing there, urging him and saying, “Come over to Macedonia and help us.” And when Paul had seen the vision, immediately we sought to go into Macedonia, concluding that God had called us to preach the gospel to them.”  Acts 16:7-10

Since the end of the apostolic age, we wouldn’t expect God to give a pastoral team a vision in the night to direct the future of a church. 
American Lutherans would probably be skeptical about that anyway.  We should, however, expect our God to direct our church’s future.  How?  Well, when God’s people spend serious time in God’s Word, the Spirit of Jesus prepares them to recognize and accept his leading.  Knowing God’s will is essential to following God’s will.  When God’s people are passionate about bringing God’s love and forgiveness to people who are lost in their own ideas and desires, the church will see opportunities and discover strategies.  Expect that.  When believers pray earnestly for God’s direction, God answers them.  His answer may be an unexpected possibility for reaching a new audience with the gospel or it may be a renewed commitment to love hurting members and spiritually re-connect with drifting friends and relatives.  When Christians are united in faith and purpose, the Holy Spirit brings them together around a focus for their church’s future.  A congregation’s vision is a shared direction. 

There are a few insights for us in St. Paul’s experience at Troas.  God has a way of closing some doors and opening others.  When we can’t get past multiple obstacles in our planning, maybe we should look for another direction, as Paul did. In my experience, God finds it easier to redirect churches that are aggressively pursuing their mission than to get self-satisfied churches off their pews.  Don’t wait for the perfectly crafted game plan; get going. The word immediately in Acts 16 deserves attention.  The author of The Purpose-Driven Church wrote: “Don’t ask God to bless what you’re doing; do what he’s blessing.”  The apostle’s mission team had seen the Spirit bring people to faith as they proclaimed forgiveness and eternal life in Jesus through relationships they developed in Jewish synagogues and Gentile marketplaces.  They were eager to take that strategy to new communities in the Greco-Roman world.  How can our church build on what God is blessing in our midst?  Be bold enough to dream.

Root us so deeply in your Word, Lord, that our hearts mirror your heart in love for others.  Create in us a passionate sense of purpose, so that we recognize opportunities to share your truth.  Overcome our reluctance and unite us in goals that give you glory and fulfill your mission. And in our personal lives, give us purpose and guidance, for Jesus’ sake.  Amen.


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